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Joe Villaescusa Says Real Estate Increasingly Paperless

While there are still classifieds out there, the majority of customers are using phones and computers to conduct business instead, according to Joe Villaescusa. There are more ways than ever for potential customers to view and share information about properties. Mobile devices are playing a huge role in the process, and they are expected to overtake computers as the main devices for home browsing in as soon as two years. Potential customers are also heading online to look for information about real estate agents and what communities they are adept and not adept to sell in.

The huge boom in instantaneous information sharing has been well documented. In a sector like real estate, consumers will spend infinitely more time researching a potential purchase than in almost any other. With mortgages lasting up to thirty years they can hardly be blamed for being cautious, but what kind of effect is this having on the market?

As cellular phones and tablets overtake computers as the number one way to research listings, Joe Villaescusa encourages customers to take advantage of the technology. Researching an area’s school system, surrounding attractions, and quality of life is now a viable option–no matter where you are. In the past potential buyers were forced to either take another’s word or see the property in person. Now, viewing photos of the home and its surrounding area is possible while sitting on lunch break at work. A customer is able to send an email immediately to a company or agent without having to wait to return home and use a computer.

For a company to take advantage of this instantaneous browsing and clicking culture they must have a mobile friendly website. Many of the sites on the web currently originally were designed to be used with desktop computers and laptops. These devices have larger screens and also translate the site’s coding a bit differently. For a real estate to have their company or profile appear neatly they should take the time to insure it works well with all devices. Companies should consider creating a mobile app, says Joe Villaescusa. These apps allow customers to search for content with ease instead of having to zoom and resize the information on their web browser. Many giants in the real estate industry already have apps for both android and iOs platforms and many more are sure to follow.

ONLINE INFORMATION VITAL, SAYS JOE VILLAESCUSA

Joe Villaescusa is confident that this information sharing will prove positive for some real estate companies and negative for others. He advises customers to gather as much information about agents and companies as possible, and also cautions independent agents to be wary of their presence online.

As the number of Internet users has increased so has the number of websites. With this increase in sites comes an increase in information, both positive and negative. Now it is possible for customers to conduct what is known as a “Google Interview” where they type in an agent’s name and read every possible piece of literature about him or her. With so many websites there is bound to be a negative review somewhere, which is less important as long as there are plenty of positive ones to overshadow it. Joe Villaescusa encourages potential buyers to look up their agent and review his or her history. Agents who have made efficient sales and aided in smooth purchases will have at least a couple of glowing reviews on sites, both company based and independent.

The real estate agents and companies should make the most of this free publicity, says Joe Villaescusa. By ensuring that sales are made honestly and efficiently, a host of positive reviews will follow and help boost revenue. One great technique to create a positive online standing is to be proactive about it. After a sale companies and agents should encourage the buyer and seller to share their thoughts about the process online. Customers will likely do this if they have had a positive experience. This is a double-edged sword, however, as negative postings can have a truly harmful impact on potential buyer interest. If an agent is not an expert in a certain area he or she should practice extreme caution in advertising otherwise. Online reviews will spread like wildfire, and if found to be misleading agents will have a difficult time securing business in the future.

As the real estate market heads into the future there are still a couple of certainties. Customers will use whatever happens to be the most efficient way of researching potential homes and companies, meaning cellular traffic is vital to both parties in the process. Also, buyers and sellers will not hesitate to share their experience online and any company hoping for growth should be mindful of its online presence. Joe Villaescusa expects the growth of this technology aid new and exciting possibilities in the real estate field.